Andy Murray: Greek teenager accused me of trying to ‘get him out of his depth’

Murray previously enjoyed a great relationship with Tsitsipas Andy Murray says he “lost respect” for Greece’s rising star Stefanos Tsitsipas after the teenager accused him of trying to “get him out of his depth”…

Andy Murray: Greek teenager accused me of trying to 'get him out of his depth'


Murray previously enjoyed a great relationship with Tsitsipas

Andy Murray says he “lost respect” for Greece’s rising star Stefanos Tsitsipas after the teenager accused him of trying to “get him out of his depth” at the US Open last year.

The world number one found himself fighting against the winds and the swirling air as he lost to the 19-year-old, who lost 6-4 7-6 (7-5) in the first round.

Murray, 29, said he had not seen Tsitsipas before the match.

“If you want to say I was using all my mental energy on him – of course I was,” he said.

“I don’t have to justify that. He had eight months of practice, he was going to go out there and have a go. He was going to throw everything at me.

“I did very well to get him out of his depth.”

Swiss Stan Wawrinka is also adamant he will not apologise for claiming that U20 player Marton Fucsovics, who played in the same tournament last year, had walked on to the court only an hour before their first-round match.

Wawrinka’s comments at the event in July 2016 came about a week after Tsitsipas, then just 16, beat the 30-year-old to win the Wimbledon boys’ title.

‘I believe him’

GB number one Kyle Edmund said that criticism was just how it was for 18-year-old British Davis Cup winner Cameron Norrie after he lost to Adrian Mannarino of France in three sets at the French Open in May.

He added that Tsitsipas, the youngest of the five in the second group of 20-year-olds who have made a significant impact on the men’s tour, could have been “upset” by the media’s treatment of his compatriot Norrie.

“I didn’t like what he was going through, because at that age you don’t expect that,” said Edmund.

“I think that’s why you’re talking about young British guys, so you don’t write a story about how excited they are, they’ve been handed a dream life, but I think a few words go around a little bit.

“I think that’s the thing of getting older, because you start to read that stuff a little bit.

“I think that he got upset by it a bit. I think he was quite upset about it afterwards, even though it wasn’t an issue, because it got picked up everywhere.

“People were talking about him maybe being upset about it. It was kind of a sad thing, but there’s nothing you can do.”

Media playback is not supported on this device Edmund upset with criticism of ‘world-class’ Norrie

Edmund suggests the best athletes always have their feet on the ground, and as a result those who sometimes feel “under pressure” can sometimes become over-eager.

“They want to impress, they want to do well, but it’s a fine line between enjoying it and not wanting to do things to try to impress,” said the world number two.

“It’s the nature of the beast. They’re all good kids, all dedicated to what they do, wanting to improve.

“Some players are wired a little bit more than others, because they’ve been really successful at very young ages.

“At the end of the day, that’s how it is. I believe his age is a factor, I think he’s not getting fully prepared for every match.

“It’s a matter of him understanding that a few hours after the match, he gets back to practising and practice, and once the tournament gets underway, you’re in the moment.

“I hope that he learns that quickly.”

Murray and Australian Nick Kyrgios have been nominated as the first-player response of the year by the International Tennis Federation.

Tennis’s governing body has received nominations from the governing bodies of every Grand Slam winner since Rafael Nadal took the French Open crown in 2013.

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