Cameras to light up night sky for Canada’s 150th on national day

What to Know Due to high tides, wild fireworks displays are likely The Northern Lights photos may begin soon, but it won’t be until 2019 The firework displays are on an incredible 8-day “supercell”…

Cameras to light up night sky for Canada's 150th on national day

What to Know Due to high tides, wild fireworks displays are likely

The Northern Lights photos may begin soon, but it won’t be until 2019

The firework displays are on an incredible 8-day “supercell” firestorm

Fireworks will light up the night sky this week in northern Canada to celebrate the country’s sesquicentennial on July 1, but they will be mostly visible by those with the right equipment – and who know what to look for.

“It’s going to be similar to the stuff you see at New Year’s, but with the strikes happening every night,” said Mark Warner, the Vice President of the northern lights webcam project CNDSNHG – simply “Canada’s Wilder Wild.”

Warner, along with his partner Paul Harris, are lighting up some of the most remote areas of Canadian’s Northwest Territories with a weekly camera display of the natural phenomena known as the northern lights, also known as the aurora borealis.

The phenomenon, in addition to lighting up the night sky, is also a harbinger of aurora-filled nights to come, Warner said.

Periods when lighting rises from a cloud or tide will vary, but Warner predicts the first sightings of the aurora this year could start within the next few days.

Warner’s camera has captured hundreds of wild activity shots in what he’s described as “beautiful, amazing” scenery, including on the shore of Duncan Lake, Canada.

After rising to the top of the terrain, the camera captures black vortices violently ripping along the Earth’s surface, the eye of the storm.

Warner, who was chosen to be the project leader by UNESCO to present Northern Lights Week last year, describes the image as one of the hardest to capture.

And when the four cameras that cover the Arctic Circle are turned on as a show for the cameras in eastern Canada, they begin to do the work themselves, hunting down the airglow and exploding in a violent series of fireworks displays for the camera.

Warner will be putting on another show at the Douglas Lake community this week, with a much bigger impact on the sky.

Because of the tremendous amount of dust and gases released by giant fireworks displays, Warner’s team will be including a firework display that will explode for eight days.

And with nine cameras heading to once again the border of Nunavut to continue their spectacular displays for Canada’s 150th birthday, Warner is hoping these two weeks of intensity will become a regular summer season.

“Hopefully we’ll get a whole season of aurora displays,” Warner said.

The camera shoots every week, in order to keep up to the pressures of the firestorm. Warner’s team will have a daily camera report on the Northern Lights Blog.

You can also view the photographs at the campaign’s site.

(Image: courtesy of CNDSNHG)

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