Climate change: will Brussels kick the fossil fuel habit?

The EU has an ambitious climate change and energy strategy. But will the EU ramp up carbon capture and storage or bet on nuclear power? An editorial looks at ways of delivering this ambitious…

Climate change: will Brussels kick the fossil fuel habit?

The EU has an ambitious climate change and energy strategy. But will the EU ramp up carbon capture and storage or bet on nuclear power? An editorial looks at ways of delivering this ambitious set of targets

The EU has an ambitious climate change and energy strategy. But will the EU ramp up carbon capture and storage or bet on nuclear power? An editorial from Guardian readers looks at ways of delivering this ambitious set of targets:

Leaders have failed to agree the post-2020 power industry strategy. As a result, a series of measures, including the regulation of ETS (emissions trading scheme) compliance, have been delayed. Adopting ambitious climate targets may take years. Make the system work faster by urgently reforming the system to better implement changes. Support a transition to renewable and offshore energy. Alternative sources of energy should be seen as part of the solution to decarbonisation, as should new solutions. Industry and renewable energy must grow at the same time. Take European shale gas seriously to create a competitive supplier base for 2025. Treat fossil fuels like a dirty fuel, and invest in clean technologies. As gas becomes increasingly difficult to mine, reach and transport, pursue the capture and storage of emissions from gas terminals, refineries and power plants. Enable users of gas and oil to adapt their operations to achieve the same emission reduction as power stations. While greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continue to rise, develop and expand the use of renewable energy and nuclear energy. Invest in energy efficiency, by making buildings more energy efficient, in factories, and in transportation. Consumers and industry should have the power to choose their energy providers. An open market provides innovative options. A safety net system should be developed.

In other news, the European commission will unveil plans to regulate imports of solar panels and polysilicon, in order to reduce Chinese state subsidies for the product. This could push Chinese prices up. On top of that, lawmakers in the European parliament are demanding that Ireland reimburse the UK for the cost of bringing back windfarms and other renewable energy to the UK. Read more about the UK’s contentious role in the Brexit negotiations.

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