Is ‘America First’ going to hurt the American electronics industry?

U.S. President Trump’s touted “America First” agenda is coming to bear here in Intel’s home country – specifically, on its chip supply chain in Illinois, from which 60% of its processors come. As a…

Is 'America First' going to hurt the American electronics industry?

U.S. President Trump’s touted “America First” agenda is coming to bear here in Intel’s home country – specifically, on its chip supply chain in Illinois, from which 60% of its processors come. As a result, Intel is reportedly looking for several large suppliers and several additional plants to be up and running by 2022.

Rumors about some consolidation in the IT sector are nothing new, given the general sense that there are fewer and fewer investors for corporations on a global scale. But while some companies are shoring up their storage and server space first with joint ventures, long-haul projects, or even mergers, Intel’s choice seems to be to extend the American tech industry’s reach. As The Information reported, “[Intel] is talking to Texas Instruments, Micron Technology, Qorvo, Microchip Technology, United Microelectronics Corp., Via Technologies and a slew of others about a potential partnership.”

Quartz agrees: “[Big companies] have talked about moving manufacturing jobs overseas, but now they’re talking about using the U.S. as a single factory site. This isn’t just about smartphones: on Monday, Bloomberg News cited sources saying Intel is looking for a white-box server manufacturer, sources with knowledge of the matter said. According to those people, Intel wants to use the at-home equipment that so many people already have.”

Quartz thinks the move may pay off if it makes Intel a “global super factory.” Via Technologies is reportedly the Intel’s lead chip partner. What’s the play? Why do you think it’s happening?

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