Is Your Gut Affecting Your Brain? A New Gene Test Could Help

The Omicron is just one of hundreds of genes that may be involved in the development of certain types of schizophrenia. To see if and how the variant might contribute to the disorder, researchers…

Is Your Gut Affecting Your Brain? A New Gene Test Could Help


The Omicron is just one of hundreds of genes that may be involved in the development of certain types of schizophrenia. To see if and how the variant might contribute to the disorder, researchers of this new Omicron test are conducting preliminary studies in monkey models and in humans. The Omicron genes code for the acid genotype—literally hundreds of genetically-determined and closely related reactions—that controls the exact pH balance of certain tissues in the body.

One of the effects of acid genotype modifications is the dampening of the acid a cell needs to be healthy. Similar to memory learning and the pharmaceutical ingredients used to induce hypoglycemia, the Omicron variant changes the acid cell’s interface to an acidic one. That makes it easier for reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as catalact cells to seed the cells in the body (groin, stomach) with particles that are harmful to the cell. So when the cell loses its acid balance, that cascade begins.

When your cellular pH reaches a hyper-ionized state, the pH stability is disrupted and cells begin producing anti-cerebral activity by attacking neighboring cells and membranes. The brain becomes permeable to water, and mucous membranes degrade. Heart, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems also degrade. These physiological deficits increase risk for diabetic, cardiovascular, and some cancers, and, in some cases, predispose to early death. However, Omicron variants also strongly impact organs that aren’t directly linked to cell tissue: heart, cartilage, bone, and skin.

In the last couple of years, pharmaceutical companies have been scrambling to produce new treatments for schizophrenia. Few are currently available and, without the controversial and controversial class of antipsychotic drugs—the so-called benzodiazepines—a cure is elusive. When a psychiatrist begins treating a patient for schizophrenia, the amount of benzodiazepines the doctor prescribes immediately drops precipitously. Patients start to experience withdrawal symptoms, which are worsened by withdrawal symptoms that often take longer to appear than expected. The result is that some people’s periods of recovery and relapse often carry over for years. Now, new psychotherapy options are emerging. For example, 3-D cell imaging has allowed researchers to glimpse the interior anatomy of an individual patient’s brain; they can see what neurotransmitters and other cells have been damaged and changed by the drug, and what has not been altered. For the first time, researchers can diagnose a specific drug-induced effect in the brain.

Zellweger says that looking at cells in their electrical and biological way is promising for identifying the root cause of illness and creates new therapies that may work better and last longer.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s new show is “World’s Oddest Medical Discovery”, and he is an CNN Health and CNN news anchor.

(c) 2018 CNN Wire Services

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