Justin Rose says Masters win at Augusta is his ‘goal’ to inspire Afro-Caribbean golfers

Rose broke barriers when he was the first Black professional to play on the PGA Tour in 1973, before Trevor Immelman became the first Black golfer to win a major When Rose broke the…

Justin Rose says Masters win at Augusta is his 'goal' to inspire Afro-Caribbean golfers

Rose broke barriers when he was the first Black professional to play on the PGA Tour in 1973, before Trevor Immelman became the first Black golfer to win a major

When Rose broke the glass ceiling at the age of 27, he was the first black professional golfer in the United States to play on the PGA Tour. Although Trevor Immelman was the first Black winner of a major when he claimed the 2010 Masters, Rose is regarded as a pioneer in a sport that has seen few minority recruits.

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There were no African-Americans in the field at the 2013 Open Championship at Lytham as Lincicome failed to qualify, while Sergio García, and Jack Nicklaus’s grandson, James, both were overlooked. Woods’s son, Charlie, was also overlooked by the Augusta National Club when he became eligible last year after playing the Junior Amateur Championship in 2000.

Despite enjoying a flourishing playing career, Rose’s early career was blighted by the second tour bankruptcy of his life, and the breakdown of his marriage. However, he never complained about his career, calling it “one of the best experiences of my life”.

Rose confirmed to the Times that he had always wanted to be in a position to inspire an Afro-Caribbean nation and said “nothing would have seemed more realistic than winning my first major championship and having it be at Augusta, which was a goal of mine since I started playing golf.”

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