‘The Word’ with Ana Marie Cox: When over-sharing becomes common practice

I’m glad NPR Classic’s new quiz show “The Word” is on TV. You know why? As NPR’s Michael J. Coren said last week, “[I]t sort of shows you what it is to have a…

'The Word' with Ana Marie Cox: When over-sharing becomes common practice

I’m glad NPR Classic’s new quiz show “The Word” is on TV. You know why? As NPR’s Michael J. Coren said last week, “[I]t sort of shows you what it is to have a really bizarre situation in your life. At all times.”

In the introduction, Coren further explained, “For ‘The Word’ every team consists of a female person and a male person. A male guest and a female guest.”

As I watched, my first thought was, “this sure does look a lot like the companion show “Nova,” another edition of which, “Staircase,” is about human incarceration. Somehow, I couldn’t help thinking “at least the Nautilus building has access to 20-foot-tall windows.”

You may wonder why I say all of this. The truth is I don’t watch a lot of TV. I also rarely read, so I have no real idea what you want to know about “The Word.” But the worst part of a show like “The Word” is that it doesn’t sound like it’s actually happening in the near future. In the very first sequence, the show is shown over a newsroom conference room, which is talking about building 9, the Nimax Tower under construction in Tokyo.

You can hear the woman on the show discussing her complicated relationship with a man she is dating; then she goes to a hotel lobby to share her story and decides to say that’s exactly what men do to women when they date.

The whole thing plays out with about five seconds of sound — in essence, a rough cross-stitch of the story. And it’s how I felt watching the show. At times the stories appear unconvincing, even silly. After taking one look, I realized I was in a quandary: was this news or just a good way to waste time? I was glad I hadn’t paid attention because later, as I watched, I did, and it looked like the show will be around awhile.

I now want to try to find out where I was spending my time: in the movie theater during my February visit to Los Angeles, where I watched “Sleeping With Other People” (just a brief recap because I could). This show would have fallen under “In Case You Missed It, and Then to Cut You Off Completely” but just got eliminated because I’m probably not interested in watching or/and a quick review of “Sleeping With Other People.”

Thus, I will not tell you anything about the cast or about the premise, but if it were to run for five seasons, I’m interested and perhaps a small part of me is addicted. And, of course, I have a very messy apartment. A huge part of my Twitter and Facebook accounts are devoted to tidying up after I gather around the stove, my trashcan and my dishes.

I spent about an hour last week cleaning up the mess before I could host my column, tweeting something like, “Looks like I’m finally going to get around to cleaning my fridge!” and just having to watch to the end. Here’s hoping I can maybe get around to cleaning up a room before I can work. My legs are numb and bloody, but that hasn’t stopped me from working, regardless. If that wouldn’t make my pot noodles appetizing, it’s not much help to me anyway.

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Erica Esquivel is a writer who has an app of the now infamous man who climbed on top of the Statue of Liberty to symbolize the sanctity of life. The “The Interview” app, though relatively basic, can be used to create the visual content and find related videos to create a growing mosaic on the epic battle between South Park’s Cartman and Viacom’s programmer President Chumway.

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