Three things we can expect to see this hurricane season

Written by By Mia Wolf. Mia Wolf is a freelance journalist and meteorologist based in the southern United States. She is editor of Weather News Network in Atlanta. The season is already underway, and…

Three things we can expect to see this hurricane season

Written by By Mia Wolf.

Mia Wolf is a freelance journalist and meteorologist based in the southern United States. She is editor of Weather News Network in Atlanta.

The season is already underway, and a first true hurricane of the new decade arrived on the heels of a storm-weary winter. This season’s first major storm, Maria, was responsible for lives lost, billions in damage and millions in expenses. The main irony, when you consider the storms during recent months, is that the storms were not dampened by any El Niño, which does reduce and limit Atlantic rainfall and wind.

If we’re looking at the long-term trend over this coming hurricane season, it appears as though it will be at least on par with last year.

Hannah Elizondo is lead forecast meteorologist at AccuWeather, which provides forecasts for international and U.S. industries, public and private clients, including airlines, cities, and provinces.

“We are expecting above normal in terms of Atlantic storm formation,” said Elizondo.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30.

This year, forecasters predicted eight to 13 named storms. The Atlantic hurricane season has an average of 11 named storms, six hurricanes and three of those major, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The three major named storms are larger than category 3 storms, according to the National Hurricane Center.

While droughts and record warmth and above-average precipitation has been more to the current point, Elizondo said the coming storms will not be characterized by them.

“There is a different kind of storm season coming,” she said. “The other big thing you need to know is that it’s looking pretty active and that means the kind of conditions that we have a tendency to see more of is a lot of warm water water in the Atlantic.”

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